Meet our District Governor 2021-22 (23 June 2021)

Leo Farrelly is from Canberra. Leo joined Rotary in 1989 as a member of the Rotary Club of
Belconnen for 5 years and rejoined in 2008. LEO served as President in 2015-2016 and has filled many other positions in the Club.

Leo served as Assistant Governor of D9710 Group 5 for the period 2016-2017 to 2018-2019, and has been reappointed to that role for the 2019-2020 year prior to the inauguration of D9705.

Leo is a member of the Paul Harris Society and a member of the Scouting Rotarians Fellowship. His wife Elaine has been a member of Inner Wheel since 1979.

Leo is Principal and owner of PPM Strategies Pty Ltd a company that provides training in project and programme management directed at achievement of an organisation’s strategic plan.
Leo served 24 years in the Royal Australian Navy retiring in 1987 as a Lieutenant Commander in the Weapons Electrical Engineering branch. He served in Destroyer Escorts but did a 12 month stint on the aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne and 2 years at the patrol boat base HMAS Tarangau on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea.

After the Navy he worked in Defence industry and became interested in structured project management methods and the application of programme management approaches for the achievement of an organisation’s strategic plan.

Although retired, Leo continues to teach programme management on a regular basis, as he finds it very relevant to his Rotary work and his desire to see Rotary regenerate itself and thrive into the future.

Meet our RI President 2021-22 (23 June 2021)

Shekhar Mehta

Rotary Club of Calcutta-Mahanagar
West Bengal, India

Mehta, an accountant, is chair of the Skyline Group, a real estate development company he founded. He is also a director of Operation Eyesight Universal (India), a Canada-based organization.

Mehta has been actively involved in disaster response and is a trustee of ShelterBox, UK. After the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, he helped build nearly 500 homes for families affected by the disaster.

He pioneered a program that has performed more than 1,500 life-changing heart surgeries in South Asia. He is also the architect of the TEACH Program, which promotes literacy throughout India and has reached thousands of schools.

A Rotary member since 1984, Mehta has served Rotary as director, member or chair of several committees, zone coordinator, training leader, member of The Rotary Foundation Cadre of Technical Advisers, and district governor. He is also the chair of Rotary Foundation (India).

Mehta has received Rotary’s Service Above Self Award and The Rotary Foundation’s Citation for Meritorious Service and Distinguished Service Awards.

He and his wife, Rashi, are Major Donors and members of the Bequest Society.

Presidential Initiatives

Equality is a fundamental human right, and it’s necessary for a peaceful, prosperous, and sustainable world. Still, girls and women worldwide face inequities in areas including health and education and experience significant violence and disproportionate poverty. Rotary encourages clubs and districts to prioritize projects that improve the health, well-being, education, and economic security of girls in their communities and around the world. Take on a club-based initiative, a district grant, or a global grant that engages members of your community in a project that will protect and empower girls and increase equity by ensuring their access to resources that will improve their lives.

Host a Rotary Day of Service: a meaningful day of hands-on service activities where Rotary members and the community come together to improve their community.

Plan to attend a Presidential Conference. The 2021-22 presidential conference series will highlight the humanitarian work that Rotary clubs and districts pioneer locally and support globally.

2021 Rotary International Convention (18 April 2021)

Registration is open for the 2021 Virtual Convention.

REGISTER NOW

The 2021 Virtual Convention will be better than ever, opening more innovative opportunities to learn and to engage with the family of Rotary, near and far. You’ll be able to network in virtual lounges, meet new partners in service, and join fun activities with Rotary members from around the world.

This event is open to all Rotary members and participants from 12-16 June 2021. Registration fees are as follows:

  • Promotional rate: US$49* through 11:59:59 (Chicago time – CDT) 7 May
  • US$65 – 8 May through 16 June

*Registration must be paid in full between 16 April and 7 May to receive the US$49 rate.

Registration is also now open for the Rotaract, Youth Exchange Officer and Inter-Country Committee preconventions, which will be held 10-11 June 2021. The cost of each preconvention event is US$20.

Both the convention and preconvention events include access to the virtual House of Friendship.

Please note: Cancellations and refunds for registrations or associated events will be accepted through 11:59:59 (Chicago time – CDT) 31 May 2021. The cancellation fee is 20% of the registrant’s total fees paid. No refunds will be given after 31 May.

Virtual House of Friendship

Our virtual House of Friendship is where convention attendees gather to learn about Rotary products and services, share project information, and shop.

Those interested in showcasing their product or service should email exhibitor@rotary.org for more information or to request an exhibit application.

10-11 June Preconvention Events

Thursday 10 June

8:00 – 9:00 AM – Preconvention Opening Session

12:00 – 1:00 PM – Preconvention Breakout sessions

2:00 – 3:00 PM – Preconvention Breakout sessions

5:00 – 6:00 PM – Preconvention Breakout sessions

7:00 – 8:00 PM – Preconvention Breakout sessions

Friday 11 June

8:00 – 9:00 AM– Preconvention Breakout sessions

8:00 AM – 6:00 PM – House of Friendship

10:00 – 11:00 AM – Preconvention Breakout sessions

12:00 – 1:00 PM – Preconvention Breakout sessions

2:00 – 3:00 PM – Preconvention Breakout sessions

5:00 – 6:00 PM – Preconvention Closing Session

12-16 June Convention 

Saturday 12 June

8:00 – 9:00 AM – Opening Ceremonies

8:00 AM – 6:00 PM – House of Friendship 

12:00 – 1:00 PM – Convention Breakout sessions

6:00 – 7:00 PM – Convention Breakout sessions

Sunday 13 June

8:00 – 9:00 AM– General Session

8:00 AM – 6:00 PM – House of Friendship 

12:00 – 1:00 PM – Convention Breakout sessions

6:00 – 7:00 PM – Convention Breakout sessions

Monday 14 June

8:00 – 9:00 AM – Convention Breakout sessions

8:00 AM – 6:00 PM – House of Friendship 

12:00 – 1:00 PM – Convention Breakout sessions

6:00 – 7:00 PM – Convention Breakout sessions

Tuesday 15 June

8:00 – 9:00 AM – Convention Breakout sessions

8:00 AM – 6:00 PM – House of Friendship 

12:00 – 1:00 PM – Convention Breakout sessions

6:00 – 7:00 PM – Convention Breakout sessions

Wednesday 16 June

8:00 – 9:00 AM – Convention Breakout sessions

8:00 AM – 6:00 PM – House of Friendship 

12:00 – 1:00 PM – Convention Breakout sessions

6:00 – 7:00 PM – Closing Ceremonies

Children’s Medical Emergency Fund for District 9705 (3 March 2021)

Background

The Fund was established by Rotary District Governor Ted Watch and his wife Nooreen (1989-90). The donations commenced in lieu of the custom of presenting flowers to the partner (wife) of the District Governor during visits to clubs. They had a grandchild needing medical treatment in Sydney and thought that others might not be able to afford the expenses associated. Tradition in District 9710 and now in D9705 is that the partner of the DG receives applications from Rotarians or Clubs on use of the funds. Any recommendations are put to the Board for approval.

Any club or a single Rotarian can make a recommendation.

Request of District Governor Michael

The request of District Governor Michael and his wife Helen is that you consider a donation to the Children’s Medical Emergency Fund. If you are prepared to do so the details of the Children’s Medical Emergency Fund account are as follows:

Bank                                                                   St George
Name of account                                              RI D9705 Inc CMEF Account
BSB                                                                      112879
Account number                                               479922903

Please make sure you identify your club and it would be appreciated if you also sent an email to Treasurer Rosemary Everett to let her know you have made the donation …  reverett@netspace.net.au.

Thank you for considering this matter. And, if you have already made a donation, thanks very much.

Taipei Convention 2021 (13 February 2021)

The Rotary International Convention, scheduled for 12-16 June 2021, in Taipei, Taiwan, will now be a virtual event in response to the ongoing threat of COVID-19.

We will post more details of how to register as they become available.

Welcome to 2021 (10 January 2021)

VOCATIONAL SERVICE MONTH

Rotary is a global network that strives to build a world where people unite and take action to create lasting change, Rotary values diversity and celebrates the contributions of people of all backgrounds, regardless of their age, ethnicity, race, color, abilities, religion, socioeconomic status, culture, sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity.

The video above produced by Rotary International in Britain & Ireland encourages Rotarians to use their particular vocational skills to make a difference to the world.

Having a broad range of vocations within each Rotary Club assists in your Club’s ability to work in your own community or internationally to achieve a better world for us all.

Food Plant Solutions (3 November 2020)

Rotary Action Group

This is a Rotary Action Group and RAWCS project (32-2009-10) that I have been impressed with for many years. What they offer could be incorporated into many of our existing RAWCS Overseas aid projects.

A SOLUTION THAT ENDS MALNUTRITION

We create educational materials that explain what nutritional food is, why our bodies need it and how to grow and use it. We focus on what are often neglected and underutilized plants, plants that are growing in and adapted to their environment, and are high in the most beneficial nutrients.  Our materials are designed to empower people, but particularly women, so that they can make informed choices on what plants to grow and eat that will nutritiously feed themselves and their families.  This project is cost effective, proven to work, sustainable and enables self-sufficiency.

We can end malnutrition – it’s as simple as growing the right plant in the right place.

Recently they were featured on an ABC Landline program that you can watch by clicking on this link – ABC Landline Program

You can see more on their website by clicking here – Food Plant Solutions

Congratulations Bev (5 October 2020)

NSW Senior Volunteer of the Year – Bev Cooney, OAM, MOHpe from Bathurst

Congratulations to Bev, a member of the E-Club Serving Humanity and Honorary member of the Rotary Club of Bathurst, on being awarded NSW Senior Volunteer of the Year 2020. Bev Cooney helped establish the Dementia Café – cleverly name Dcafe – at The Neighbourhood Centre in Bathurst. Volunteers have been trained to help run the café which provides a space for people with dementia to come together, interact and maintain a sense of connection with the local community and its people.

Bev is co-ordinating a volunteer program at Bathurst Hospital known as CHOPS (Confused Hospitalised Older Persons Volunteer Program.

The aim of the program for patients with dementia and delirium is to enhance the emotional care and security of patients during their stay in hospital. The program supports family and carers and the nursing staff. This includes assisting patients with eating and drinking, gentle exercise, promoting the wearing of hearing and visual aids and appropriate therapeutic activities.

In Bathurst, volunteers have made books that are of interest to patients as well as assisting nurses with handover at shift change.

Volunteers undergo an appropriate selection and training process. This volunteer program model, supported by Director of Nursing and Midwifery Brad Molenkamp, is the responsibility of nursing and allied health staff.

Bev indicates the Bathurst Hospital requires three people on each shift in the Medical, Surgical and Rehabilitation wards.

Not content with just supporting the CHOPS program in the hospital Bev has embarked on an education program to ensure Bathurst becomes a Dementia Friendly Community. With the growth in our population and the large community of retirees the instances of Dementia is growing.

Alzheimer’s Australia and the Australian Government are encouraging towns to introduce the Dementia Friendly Cities Program to make lives easier for the people who suffer this insidious disease. With three in ten people over the age of 80 and one in ten over 65 with dementia, it is timely for our community to be active.

 Bev indicates that simple education programs, adjusting signs around town and by making shopping centres, cafes and restaurants dementia friendly we can improve Bathurst to be one of the most modern cities in this country.

We are proud to have Bev as a member of our Rotary Club. She has achieve much in her life assisting those less fortunate.

Bev has previously been recognised for her volunteer work in Peru. read her story below:

Bev Cooney’s Story – Chasing Dreams in Peru

06 Nov 2013

Walking through a hospital, one could be forgiven for not having their wits about them. There are clinicians and nurses darting this way and that, patients being ferried from one ward to another and concerned visitors anxiously making their way to the nearest information desk to find the whereabouts of their loved one. In this beehive of activity, there is rarely a minute to slow down and take in what’s happening around you. So slow down, and take a minute to read this.

Last month Bev Cooney, an Enrolled Nurse at Westmead Hospital, received the Medal of the Order of Australia. One would automatically assume such an award would be directly aligned with her profession. But Bev’s story is much more than that.

Bev has been a nurse for 47 years, spending most of her time working in children’s hospitals. In 2003, Bev accomplished one of her lifelong dreams of travelling to Peru in South America. She walked the Inca trail, visited untouched rainforests and saw some of the finest sites that part of the world has to offer. But the best thing she did, in her own words, was visit a “big kid’s hospital”.

“Like everybody else in Australia I thought we had nothing in our hospitals, but I soon realised we had everything. So I decided that I should help these people,” Bev said.

4 Boat donated by Bev to the town of Satipo

Bev didn’t just “help”. In 2006, she founded a school and rehabilitation centre that provides medical care and education for children and adults with disabilities and their families. She raised funds for the construction of the school and rehabilitation centre including using some of her own superannuation payout.

“The year after my first visit I took a team of surgeons, anaesthetists and nurses and we worked in the big kid’s hospital in Lima for a little while. From there we went out to the jungle with a team of local doctors to a town called Satipo, which had a 19 bed hospital, but while we were there I saw 500 kids that were disabled who could not go to school. They were not permitted to go to school,” Bev said.

This really worried her. As a nurse working with disabled kids every day in Australia, it was inconceivable to see them marginalised in another part of the world. Disabled adults also fell victim to the community’s pre-conditioned view that these adults have been punished by the gods and therefore must suffer. So in 2005, Bev began to make some enquiries.

“In 2005 I went back twice to see what it would take to build a school there. I worked out approximately what it would cost, and that I could do it with my super. So I came home and retired in 2006 and I went back and built a school for 100 kids and a house for myself to live,” Bev said.

Bev started working with the Mayor of the town and managed to acquire a place for the adult disabled and taught them how to sow and started a factory. They now make clothes and sell them in the markets, and more importantly, are no longer living on the streets.

Her extraordinary accomplishments have not come without some obstacles. Bev has been shot at, kidnapped, extorted and belittled but this has not stopped her in her quest. She’s had to return to work to continue funding the centre and move to Sydney to take on the role, but she says it has all been worth it.

Next year Bev is taking a team of plastic surgeons, anaesthetists and nurses to Satipo to operate on children who are born with cleft palates. She hopes it will inspire more volunteers to share their knowledge and time for those who need it most.

In time, Bev yearns to live in her home in Satipo permanently, but now she is happy to continue her work both in Australia and Peru. Her compassion for the children of Satipo is heart-warming, and her unassuming, humble nature is inspiring. So next time you’re hurrying through a hospital take a second to slow down, because you might just pass someone as remarkable as Bev.

A First for Rotary (1 September 2020)

Jennifer E. Jones, a member of the Rotary Club of Windsor Roseland, Ontario, Canada, has been nominated to become Rotary International’s president for 2022-23.

A ground-breaking selection that will make her the first woman to hold that office in our organisation’s 115-year history.

Unless challenged, Jennifer will officially become president nominee on 1 October 2020.

Jennifer says she sees Rotary’s Action Plan as a catalyst for increasing Rotary’s impact. “As we reflect upon our new strategic priorities, we could have never envisioned that our ability to adapt would become our North Star during what is arguably the most profound time in recent history,”

Jennifer said in her vision statement. “Silver linings rise out of the most challenging circumstances. Using metric-driven goals, I will harness this historic landscape to innovate, educate, and communicate opportunities that reflect today’s reality.”

As the first woman to be nominated to be president, Jennifer understands how important it is to follow through on Rotary’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI). Statement. “I believe that diversity, equity, and inclusion … begins at the top and for us to realise growth in female membership and members under the age of forty — these demographics need to see their own reflection in leadership,”

Jennifer said. “I will champion double-digit growth in both categories while never losing sight of our entire family.”

Jones is founder and president of Media Street Productions Inc., an award-winning media company in Windsor. She was chair of the board of governors of the University of Windsor and chair of the Windsor-Essex Regional Chamber of Commerce. She has been recognized for her service with the YMCA Peace Medallion, the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal, and Wayne State University’s Peacemaker of the Year Award, a first for a Canadian. Jones holds a Doctor of Laws (LL.D.).




Why The Four-Way Test is my ethical guide (15 August 2020)

The Four-way test is as relevant today as it was when first introduced to Rotary in 1954.

S.R. Yogananda

S.R. Yogananda

By S.R. Yogananda, past district governor, past regional Rotary Foundation coordinator, and a member of the Rotary Bangalore East, Bengaluru, India

The year was 1987. I had come back from the Sultanate of Oman and was running a consumer products distribution company in Bangalore, India, when a business executive came to my office one evening. He said “I have been watching the way you do business. You are not taking short cuts, you have asked your staff and accountants to follow all the government regulations. I would like to invite you to join my Rotary club.” Rotary, he said “amongst other things, stands for integrity”

After attending a few meetings, I was inducted into the Rotary Club of Bangalore East during a colorful event in a lovely atmosphere. I attended all club and district events and began to gain a deeper understanding of this wonderful organization. I was delighted to learn that Rotary does not endorse any particular religion and is beyond boundary restrictions. Integrity is a pillar on which Rotary stands.Herb Taylor

Herbert J. Taylor, 1954-55 RI president, in his office holding a large copy of The Four-Way Test. circa 1954-55.

The story of Herbert Taylor, the past RI president who created The Four-Way Test, fascinated me, so much so that when I became president of my club I put up a large sign of the test along a busy road in Bangalore. I got it printed on a silver plate and gave it as a memento to every speaker at our meetings. I also gave it to our members on their birthdays and wedding anniversaries.

I served as the national coordinator and awards administrator for a national essay competition on The Four-Way Test held all over India, administered through Rotary clubs. This project, held for five years, was sponsored by District 6400 and the Rotary Club of Windsor, Canada.

Many times in my business, I made decisions that to an outsider might have looked unwise. There was an occasion when we could have bought a product without the taxes and sold it to make a handsome profit. When this proposal was brought to my attention, I put my foot down and said no. It failed The Four-Way Test. It was not fair to the tax authorities and to other dealers who did not have this advantage.

Another incident etched in my memory, even before joining Rotary, I was heading the special equipment division of a leading company in the Middle East. I was handling global tenders and multimillion-dollar deals. I was sitting with a top ranked bureaucrat from an important ministry who was a major customer, and he asked about the delivery of a piece of equipment that had been delayed due to a problem at the loading port. I was tempted to lie to avoid embarrassment, but working up my resolve, decided to tell him the true reason for the delay. Surprisingly, in my future dealings with him, he seemed to treat me with increased respect. Now I see this as validation of the principles behind The Four-Way Test.

The Four-Way Test is one of our great benefits as members of Rotary. It is a trustworthy ethical guide. And we have an opportunity to share it with eager young minds to the benefit of all.

The Four-Way Test

The Four-Way Test is a nonpartisan and nonsectarian ethical guide for Rotarian’s to use for their personal and professional relationships. The test has been translated into more than 100 languages, and Rotarian’s recite it at club meetings:
Of the things we think, say or do

  1. Is it the TRUTH?
  2. Is it FAIR to all concerned?
  3. Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS?
  4. Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?