DG 2022-23, Geraldine Rurenga

Rotary E‐Club of Brindabella

Geraldine joined Rotary in 2013 after completing an undergraduate degree in teaching and moving to Wagga Wagga. Since then, Geraldine has held a range of Rotary club and district executive board positions, including club president in 2016‐17 and 9705 district trainer 2017‐19. In addition, she has been involved with several other non‐profit organisations, including being a member of the management committee of the Wagga Women’s Health Centre in 2018 and 19. She has led a number of community events and fundraisers for local organisations.


Professionally, Geraldine has taught in a range of environments, from toddlers to adults, in Australia and in Denmark. After a couple of years teaching, Geraldine completed a Master of Education by research thesis, and moved into the tertiary education sector. Since 2016 Geraldine has worked at Charles Sturt University in educational design, consulting and leading educational projects including curriculum design at Goulburn NSW Police Academy and transforming university subjects for innovative online learning; and lecturing in education. Geraldine has research interests in Indigenous pedagogies, gender equity, and educational and social leadership.


Geraldine will make history as the youngest female Rotary District Governor, internationally, when she takes up the mantle in 2022. As a passionate educator and a young Rotarian, Geraldine is interested in building leadership capacity in our community’s young leaders. Geraldine’s goals in Rotary are promoting
diverse membership in clubs, and empowering young people to continue serving our global community through Rotary.

Rotary helping communities vulnerable to Covid-19

This article below is one of the reasons I am proud to be a Rotarian – PP John Roberson

Rotary’s strength in local communities and experience fighting polio can help get people who are still vulnerable vaccinated against COVID-19, Nigeria PolioPlus Chair Dr. Tunji Funsho said at a global summit about the pandemic that brought together heads of state, health officials, and philanthropic leaders.

The virtual summit on 12 May, hosted by Belize, Germany, Indonesia, Senegal, and the United States, sought to build on the goals of the first summit in September, including vaccinating more people, distributing more tests and treatments to high-risk countries, expanding the number of public health workers, and increasing funding for pandemic preparedness.

At a session focused on getting vaccines to the most vulnerable, Funsho spoke about Rotary’s work in bringing polio to the brink of eradication and how the global immunization infrastructure can be used in the global COVID-19 response.

“Our local Rotary clubs can conduct social mobilization to communicate the benefits of immunizations and our person-to-person and door-to-door strategies can achieve extraordinary results when it comes to vaccine hesitancy,” Funsho told the summit participants. “We are currently applying these same tactics to Rotary’s COVID response in Nigeria and other African countries.”

Vaccinating the world against COVID-19 requires the same sustained effort and commitment Rotary has demonstrated for decades in fighting polio, Funsho said. “We are positioned and ready to join, in partnership with others, to bring these resources and talents to vaccinate the world against COVID-19.”

Protecting the Environment

Rotary shares an interest in protecting our common legacy: the environment.

PP Darcy Geale has accepted the role of representing the Environment in our Club.

We are committed to supporting activities that strengthen the conservation and protection of natural resources, advance ecological sustainability, and foster harmony between communities and the environment.

We empower communities to access grants and other resources, embrace local solutions, and spur innovation in an effort to address the causes and reduce the effects of climate change and environmental degradation.

HOW ROTARY WILL HELP PROTECT OUR PLANET

The Rotary Foundation will enable our members and their community allies through provision of funding.

$US18.4 million in Foundation global grant funding has been allocated to environment-related causes in the past five years through our support of community economic development and water, sanitation, and hygiene projects.

Clubs and their community allies will take action in these ways:

  • Protecting and restoring land, coastal, marine, and freshwater resources
  • Enhancing the capacity of communities to support natural resource management and conservation
  • Supporting sustainable agriculture, fishing, and aquaculture practices
  • Addressing the cause of climate change by reducing the emission of greenhouse gases
  • Strengthening ecosystems and communities affected by climate change supporting education initiatives that promote behavior that protects the environment
  • Advocating for sustainable consumption to build an economy that uses resources more efficiently
  • Addressing environmental justice issues and public health concerns

The Rotary Foundation

The Rotary Foundation transforms your gifts into service projects that change lives both close to home and around the world.

The Rotary Foundation helps Rotary members to advance world understanding, goodwill, and peace by improving health, providing quality education, improving the environment, and alleviating poverty.

To support our Foundation by donation please make a direct deposit to our Club Service account:

Account Name: The Rotary E-Club Serving Humanity – Service/Projects,
Reference – Your name plus ‘TRF’
BSB: 032769           Account: 697413

Update on PNG Covid19 Crisis

The Covid19 Delta variant is ravaging Papua New Guinea and due to our proximity Australia needs to assist.

Rotary Kula Spirit Floating Clinic has been supporting Port Moresby General Hospital and Rita Flynn Field Hospital by providing PPE, masks, Oxygen Concentrators, oxygen lines to help alleviate suffering.

Professor Glen Mola, head of Obstetrics & Gynaecology at Port Moresby General Hospital has been using the Kula Spirit supplies held aboard the floating clinic to help with his task in saving mothers and babies.

We are continuing to airfreight these items needed to fight the Covid 19 infections in Papua New Guinea.

Please help us to help Papua New Guinea.

Donate to Kula Spirit Floating Clinic, RAWCS Project – 18-2009-10

Be a role model for Each One, Bring One

Posted on  in Rotary Voices

I encourage all members to look for prospective members that you might be overlooking. Please give them the opportunity to become a member of the Rotary E-Club Serving Humanity

Editor’s note: Membership is the life blood of Rotary. Surveys have confirmed that members join because they want to connect with other people and take action to create lasting change. For Membership Month in August we have asked several experts to talk about how they reach out to prospective members, keep existing members engaged, and create an environment that allows new clubs to form and thrive. This is the first in that series

Elizabeth Usovicz

By Elizabeth Usovicz, Rotary International Director, Zones 30 and 31 

Rotary connections are powerful, for both current and future members. After 16 months of lockdown, online business and virtual Rotary meetings, I recently met a longtime client for lunch. The restaurant we chose was quiet that day, and the dining area was empty except for one table.  

Our fellow diners were two young men of different races. They seemed to be talking about business as my client and I were seated at a nearby table. We didn’t focus on their conversation until our ears perked up like hyper-alert terriers when we heard one of them say, “Rotary.” 

Expanding the conversation 

My client is a past president of her Rotary club, and we both began to listen in on the young men’s conversation. One was explaining the motto of Rotary, Service Above Self, and the service projects of his local Rotary club. “I have to introduce myself,” I told my client excitedly. She laughed as I slid out of my chair and moved toward their table. 

They looked up, surprised, when I approached them. “Excuse me,” I smiled. “My colleague and I heard you say “Rotary” and we wanted to introduce ourselves.” I pointed to my lapel pin. “We are both Rotary members too!” 

Each One, Bring One – and beyond 

As it turns out, one of the men, Jeff, is a member of the Rotary club of Lee’s Summit, Missouri. He was discussing Rotary with Jordan, a prospective member. 

Jordan grinned in amazement at our Rotary connection, which happens every day for Rotary members across the globe. “Wow!” he said. “You mean people in Rotary just find each other like this?” My client, Jeff, and I each smiled. “We all serve,” I replied. “We are people from all backgrounds, all walks of life, and we all serve our communities.” 

That brief exchange was a simple, yet powerful moment of Rotary pride and purpose for three Rotary members. For Jordan, it was an impressive example of the strength of the Rotary network and our capacity to connect people across communities. 

Each one of us is a role model for growing Rotary 

Since that lunch meeting, Jordan has visited Jeff’s club twice and is on the path to becoming a member. Jeff’s support of the Presidential Initiative, “Each One Bring One” prompted me to reach out to three prospective members.  

What if each of us did the same? What if each of us encouraged the formation of a new club? By this time next year, our Rotary network and our capacity to connect people across the globe will be even more powerful. All we need to do, like Jeff, is to be a role model for Each One, Bring One. Find your Jordans and invite them to lunch. 

Read President Shekhar Mehta’s July message about Each One, Bring One 

About the author: Elizabeth Usovicz is a member of the Rotary Club of Kansas City-Plaza, Missouri, USA, and Rotary International Director for Zones 30 and 31. She was a Rotary International Women of Action honoree at the White House in 2014.